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[Day 5/5] APIvsUI Testing - Myth Buster: being a software tester is boring

Community Manager

[Day 5/5] APIvsUI Testing - Myth Buster: being a software tester is boring

Hello Guys,

 

Let's go myth-busting today!

Day 5 Task:

Myth to be busted: being a software tester is boring

 

I hear this myth quite often. At the same time, I like the feeling when I break something – this is never boring Smiley Happy How about you?

Why do you enjoy your work?

What was the most interesting/unusual bug you’ve found?

What do you laugh about at work?

 

This is the last day of the event. Let’s enjoy it by sharing some funny and exciting stories about QA.

 

Participate in today’s conversation or in the previous ones. Also, remember that you can earn +2 points if you invite your colleague to the conversation or share the event on Twitter. Find more details in the description of the bonus tasks below.

>> Track the current score

 

Spoiler

Bonus Tasks

Accomplish any of the bonus tasks to earn more points:

  1. +2 points - Invite your colleague to the competition.

Mention a nickname of this person by using @ in the competition’s daily topics. You can invite as many people as you wish. NOTE: A person you invite should be a new Community member registered after the event start.

 

  1. +2 points – Make a post on social media about your participation in the competition.

Your post should contain: @SmartBear, the #APIvsUITesting hashtag and the link to your comment in the Community.

Simple tweet: API Testing vs UI testing! Which one is more important? Join me in the @SmartBear Community to talk about this: https://bit.ly/2HEZ5U4 #APIvsUITesting

 

Event Rules

  1. Leave your comments on a conversation of the day. 1 comment = 1 point to the team score.
  2. The competition will be held on March 25-29.
  3. Join the competition any day and participate in any daily conversations.
  4. Feel free to leave comments for any teams.
  5. Rewards! A team with the biggest score will win. Active participants from each team will be rewarded.
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Tanya Gorbunova
SmartBear Community Manager

Join the September Hub-bub to show off, learn and win
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3 REPLIES 3
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Community Hero

Re: [Day 5/5] APIvsUI Testing - Myth Buster: being a software tester is boring

Why do you enjoy your work?

When you enjoy the work you all feel the difference and mind will be clear enough to put your efforts on the work. otherwise, you might not think about or create WOW factor.

 

What was the most interesting/unusual bug you’ve found?

We have a chart section in our application which will be rendered after a few spins and will display the data. Someone broke this behavior and it never stopped spinning. Most of the UI bugs will very much interesting 

 

What do you laugh about at work?

I spent almost 2 weeks to update my Name mapping on the modules which are ready to automate, after a day  Product Owners will redesign the entire screen, initially it was headache movement when this happened few times then it became funny movements in our bay.

 

I love what I do so, keeping a smile and enthusiastic personality in the workplace will always help work better. 


Thanks
Shankar R

LinkedIn | CG-VAK Software | Bitbucket | shankarr.75@gmail.com

“You must expect great things from you, before you can do them”


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Community Hero

Re: [Day 5/5] APIvsUI Testing - Myth Buster: being a software tester is boring

Anyone who says being a software tester is boring does not understand what it actually entails.  Yes, there are times of tedium when you need to spend time with documentation, writing up test plans and test cases, etc.  

But those are just the preparations for the journey.  Like doing all the research and prep work for climbing Mt. Everest.  You have to do all that tedious stuff so you can go do the exciting stuff.

 

And it is exciting!  I love finding bugs in software.  It's a hunt, a safari.  You dive into the depths of the code and search for that elusive creature, the bug, checking each hiding place. And when you find one, oh the thrill!  "Hey, look what I found!".  Of course, the developers sometimes don't appreciate that enthusiasm, but it is fun!  Like going deep sea fishing... hours of sitting and waiting, trying to lure the fish to your line... and that excitement when you finally have that massive marlin landed on the deck of your boat.

 

As I mentioned in a previous comment, I think it takes a special sort of person to be a GOOD software testers.  You have to love the hunt, the search.  Think Sherlock Holmes.  He gets BORED when there's not a challenging case.  To be a tester, you have to LOVE that challenge of digging into a new piece of code.

 

THis is what makes me laugh, not because of something funny, but because of the sheer joy of trapping that elusive bit of code that is causing trouble and being able to describe it to the developers.  I laugh out loud when, after hours of testing, I FINALLY caught one.

 

As for unusual bugs, I think the one that gave me the greatest joy was the one that got me the reaction from the developer of "It works on my machine".  I could demonstrate it, at will, on my own box every time.  I even had the developer sit down at my desk and follow the steps and reproduce it... but yet it still worked on his machine.

So, we sat down at his desk, the IDE open in front of us, and stepped through the code.  And sure enough, it worked on his machine.  We spent hours at it, trying to figure out what was different. Then we saw it.  An uninitialized boolean variable.  In the IDE, that variable was being given a value of "true" and so everything worked properly.  However, that only happened when running the code via the IDE.  When he compiled the code and ran it outside of the IDE... sure enough, it broke on his machine.  This was a particular problem with that IDE that uninitialized booleans would be defaulted to true so, if your code didn't eplicitly set the value before using the variable in a logical expression, it would always pass.  Lesson learned.


Robert Martin
[Community Expert Group]
Please consider giving a Kudo if I write good stuff
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Why automate?  I do automated testing because there's only so much a human being can do and remain healthy.  Sleep is a requirement.  So, while people sleep, automation that I create does what I've described above in order to make sure that nothing gets past the final defense of the testing group.
I love good food, good books, good friends, and good fun.

Mysterious Gremlin Master
Extensions available
Community Hero

Re: [Day 5/5] APIvsUI Testing - Myth Buster: being a software tester is boring

I started as a dev and ended up in QA and liked it so much I never went back.  My coding needs are met with automated tests, but I never have to fix anything in production in the middle of the night!  All I have to do is break things during the day and send them back.  Smiley Happy

 

The best times were when I worked at an ISP and the devs were always convinced that I wouldn't find any bugs in their code.  They lost that bet every time!

 

 

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